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When: 2017-09-03

Collection location: Rockwoods Reservation, Missouri, USA [Click for map]

Who: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)

No specimen available

Notes:
Several on a decayed log in mixed hardwoods forest. The red in the thumbnail image is an artifact … possible a shadow reflecting from my hand. The specimen’s rim is actually pure white.

Species Lists

Images

IMG_0390.JPG
Copyright © 2017 Judi Thomas
IMG_0388.JPG
Copyright © 2017 Judi Thomas
IMG_0389.JPG
Copyright © 2017 Judi Thomas

Proposed Names

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= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Jared, thank you for directing me to your
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2018-02-07 19:41:06 EST (-0500)

recent observation. Your images of the pore surfaces are very clear and very helpful. I’ll reference them the next time I encounter one of those ubiquitous white conks whose ID’s seem so cryptic to me. Your help is much appreciated.

You’re welcome!
By: Jared McRae (redeye311)
2018-02-06 20:08:03 EST (-0500)

I just posted an observation of Trametes aesculi yesterday. I have some pore photos in varius stages of growth you can check out.
http://mushroomobserver.org/308317?q=DNh8

Yes, of course. Thank you Jared.
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2018-02-06 19:33:40 EST (-0500)

You can see from my previous comment how much difficulty I have differentiating T. gibbosa from T. aesculi. Appreciate you eagle eye and help.

Thank you gentlemen, for your
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2017-09-06 21:28:12 EDT (-0400)

proposals. And so the confusion continues regarding these white shelved polypores. I’m leaning toward gibbosa due to the elongated pores and somewhat lumpy surface; however, when I look hard all over the pore surface I can find a few round pores and a very few maze-like pores along with the elongated pores. That trio triggers aesculi in my mind, which I formerly called elegans. Sometimes I feel as if I will never solve this enigma:)