Species Lists

Images

Copyright © 2017 Huafang
Copyright © 2017 Huafang

Proposed Names

47% (2)
Used references
57% (1)
Used references: “Xylaria longipes is closely related to X. polymorpha, from which it is hardly distinguishable in the field, both species exhibiting similar highly variable stromatal shape and corky‐ cracked surface. They are mainly separated based on different ascospore size range and the conspicuously sigmoid germ slit of X. longipes. Unlike what it is suggested by its name, the stromata of X. longipes are often short‐stipitate to almost sessile. It seems restricted to Acer pseudoplatanus, but X. polymorpha also occurs on this substrate, which makes microscopic examination of ascospores the only way to identify them safely.” -Fornier, Jacque. Update on European species of Xylaria, 2014. (PDF)

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
re: Huafang
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2017-10-31 10:35:55 CDT (-0400)

I began to use microscope for the first time in my life since October 2016. I received this microscope and learned to use the microscope from the same friend. My skill and knowledge is at the ELEMENTARY school level.

Everyone starts somewhere. I was terrible at the microscope before I was decent, and 5-6 years later, that’s still as good as I’ve gotten. There are excellent microscopy resources available at http://www.hyphalfusion.com/... and the https://www.photomacrography.net/ forums.

The story was it didn’t "look” like Xylaria polymorpha to me so I checked MushroomExpert.com to see what other Xylaria options I had. It looked exactly the "same” as Xylaria longipes. Then, what was germ slit? And spiraling? I went to my neighbor’s yard for MO#293870 to do comparison. Yes, those germ slips were different and spore sizes were different too.??

From Fornier, Jacque. Update on European species of Xylaria, 2014. PDF :

“Xylaria longipes is closely related to X. polymorpha, from
which it is hardly distinguishable in the field, both species
exhibiting similar highly variable stromatal shape and corky‐
cracked surface. They are mainly separated based on different
ascospore size range and the conspicuously sigmoid germ slit of
X. longipes. Unlike what it is suggested by its name, the stromata
of X. longipes are often short‐stipitate to almost sessile. It seems
restricted to Acer pseudoplatanus, but X. polymorpha also occurs
on this substrate, which makes microscopic examination of
ascospores the only way to identify them safely."

I think I can begin to spot the “gestalt,” as we say, of X. longipes, but for now I am deferring to much wiser and more experienced people in Xylariology (like Jacques), as I suggest others do as well.

I thought I’ve micrographs for both but couldn’t find them, bad file management.

The document above is the closest thing I’ve ever seen to a Xylaria monograph. I only discovered it recently. Where another paper may come close or exceed this one in terms of sheer number of species, this document outperforms by the mere presence of color photos, which I find to be hugely helpful (though most helpful when said photos are of fresh material).

All I’m trying to do is uploading my photos to Mushroom Observer. If I’d known that people will question my “authority”(which is zero and maybe negative at the moment), I would do a better job to keep records. Please keep questioning me so I know what to look for when I want to identify mushrooms.

We will! I encourage you to not take these doubts personally. The internet has a way of neutering nuance. Users who are willing to take the time to take notes, perform microscopy, and compare descriptions in literature are in the extreme minority in our 9000-member userbase. Putting in this level of attention to detail is a rewarding experience, both in terms of personal enrichment and the feedback from this community.

Let say I see those spiraling germ slips again in the future, do I need more to prove it’s definitely Xylaria longipes

If I’m not mistaken, spiraling (aka “sigmoid”) germ slits are the key differentiator between X. longipes and X. polymorpha. That is not, however, to say that other, similarly styled species couldn’t have similar germ slits, making other characters necessary to distinguish between them. That said, I would continue to scope each and every Xylaria you find. This will be a great contribution to the MO database, as we begin to sort out which species are present in your area, in the midwest, and in the US at large, and the degree to which this matches up with North American Xylaria literature.

Werdnus is our resident Xylariologist here. Whatever questions he cannot answer can be asked to Drs. Yu-Ming Ju, Jack Rogers, or a few other alpha taxonomists who are not on the site.

I began to use microscope
By: Huafang
2017-10-30 23:08:30 CDT (-0400)

for the first time in my life since October 2016. I received this microscope and learned to use the microscope from the same friend. My skill and knowledge is at the ELEMENTARY school level. The story was it didn’t "look” like Xylaria polymorpha to me so I checked MushroomExpert.com to see what other Xylaria options I had. It looked exactly the "same” as Xylaria longipes. Then, what was germ slit? And spiraling? I went to my neighbor’s yard for MO#293870 to do comparison. Yes, those germ slips were different and spore sizes were different too.

I thought I’ve micrographs for both but couldn’t find them, bad file management. All I’m trying to do is uploading my photos to Mushroom Observer. If I’d known that people will question my “authority”(which is zero and maybe negative at the moment), I would do a better job to keep records. Please keep questioning me so I know what to look for when I want to identify mushrooms.

Let say I see those spiraling germ slips again in the future, do I need more to prove it’s definitely Xylaria longipes?

that would be diagnostic
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2017-10-28 17:01:12 CDT (-0400)

for X. longipes. can you post a micrograph of this? you don’t need a fancy trinocular camera. a cell phone hovered over the eyepiece is sufficient, but it does take some practice.

I did see spiraling germ slits under microscope
By: Huafang
2017-10-28 16:15:44 CDT (-0400)

Does this change anything? Thank you for that PDF file. I’ll read them during winter. I can absorb the information but I’m pretty sure I can’t digest most of them. My tiny data base (fungi knowledge) needs to expand anyway.

Created: 2017-10-25 21:45:33 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2018-04-14 10:51:04 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 58 times, last viewed: 2019-09-03 13:48:28 CDT (-0400)
Show Log