Notes:
Spruce/pine woods. Some birch present.

Fruit body robust with fairly thick stipe for elongata. Yellow cap/annulus fits this taxon.

Decisive factor here is spore morphology. Spores examined from 3 different areas of a print, and is all cases many ellipsoid examples were observed. Quotient: (1.25)1.3 – 1.7(1.8). Spores amyloid, (6)6.5-9(9.5) x 5-6.5.

Collected in an area where both A. elongata and A/ flavoconia have often been observed in the past.

Images

Increase observed dimensions by 17%.

Proposed Names

4% (2)
Based on microscopic features
58% (1)
Based on chemical features: Blast comparisons; see comments.

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= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

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A. “flavoconia-03”
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2020-03-17 00:08:49 CDT (-0400)

is a temporary name indicating that more work needs to be done to sort out the proper epithets for the species in this group. I am currently unable to properly partition them based on the reference data available. It is relatively easy to delineate the species in the group, but not to apply the names to each grouping.

A. “flavoconia-03”
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2020-03-17 00:08:45 CDT (-0400)

is a temporary name indicating that more work needs to be done to sort out the proper epithets for the species in this group. I am currently unable to properly partition them based on the reference data available. It is relatively easy to delineate the species in the group, but not to apply the names to each grouping.

Spore morphology…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2020-03-05 23:43:48 CST (-0500)

seems to point toward A. elongata.

Blast-matched at over 99% Identity and 100% Subject Cover with each of “Amanita flavoconia”, “Amanita ‘flavoconia-03’”, “Amanita augusta”, and “Amanita flavipes”. The last two of these names apply to a western NA and Asian species, respectively; don’t know what to make of these two matches (except perhaps they are each “flavoconia type” taxa). Wondering what is the significance of the label “flavoconia-03”.

No blast matches with A. elongata (except that one of the “flavoconia-03” matches had been submitted under the name “Amanita elongata”). Naturally, I considered that at least some of the matched “flavoconia” sequences may actually represent Amanita elongata. (The two species exhibit similar gross morphology.) However, there are Amanita elongata sequences available at Genbank (four submissions each made by RET), and none of these show up as a match with this observation. I manually compared the sequence for this material with one of RET’s elongata sequences, and there are clear differences. One seemingly interesting feature is that, at a few positions where discrepancies were noted, if one character was removed from one of the two sequences and the remaining sequence was then shifted one placeholder to the left, the altered sequence produced a better match (maybe 20-30 subsequent characters matched). The positions where a removed character produced this result were ends of subsequences of repeated As or Gs (4-6 consecutive). I don’t know if there is any significance assigned to this.

Morphologically, the fruit body seen here is a bit more robust that I’d expect for A. elongata. The predominantly yellow cap and white stipe are traits associated with elongata (and flavoconia).

Not sure what to make of the implications of spore morphology. I considered the possibility that the spores photographed for this observation may exhibit exaggerated Q=L/W ratio due to the spore walls partially collapsing. However, some of the spores observed with Q in the upper range appear to be normally formed. Comparison with spores identified as Amanita flavoconia (obs 323295, photo taken with same camera through same microscope) show what appears to be an obvious difference in Q.

Created: 2018-07-06 16:53:05 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2020-03-17 00:12:59 CDT (-0400)
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