When: 2018-10-31

Collection location: Ethel, Louisiana, USA [Click for map]

Who: Logan Wiedenfeld (LoganW)

No specimen available

Notes:
Collected by Steve Antrobus under oaks. Would love to learn what RET or any of our other amanita sages have to say about its identity. I don’t think I’ve seen it before and was unable to find any obvious candidates on the Texas and Gulf States’ species list.

Steve reports that the stipe does not stain when scraped and the odor is appropriately Louisianan, like fresh peeled shrimp.

Images

IMG_0892.JPG
IMG_0894.JPG
IMG_0893.JPG
IMG_0891.JPG
IMG_0896.JPG
IMG_0900.JPG
IMG_0901.JPG

Proposed Names

31% (2)
Recognized by sight
31% (2)
Recognized by sight: unusually dark cap; same as obs 336666?

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Logan,
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2018-11-01 21:55:08 CET (+0100)

I didn’t propose canescens for mine either. I thought the cap color was too dark brown for it. But… nothing else really fit given the kind of amanitas I had been finding in the Pine Barrens over the years. A large, meaty, clunky “fence” amanita that doesn’t really fit the gestalt of sect. Validae upon a closer look… Here is what I think is more of a “textbook case” of canescens I found the same day just a mile down the road: obs 336701.

Patchy warts
By: Logan Wiedenfeld (LoganW)
2018-11-01 16:52:15 CET (+0100)

Your observation does look a lot like this one, Igor. Interesting. The reason I didn’t propose canescens, which I considered doing, was the malformed and irregular patches of uv material on the cap. I would expect raised and angular warts on canescens.