Notes:
Multiple Xerocomellus spp. were parasitized throughout Millersylvania today. The unusually warm weather and persistent rain may be a contributing factor as I have never seen so many infected collections in one day. Yellow and white tones(yellow tones seem to develop later) encase the entire fruiting body leaving a lumpy, marshmallowy mummified remnant of the once vibrant and multicolored Xerocomellus species infected. Un-parasitized fruiting bodies in this example on right and left for comparison. I harvested a small sample and dehydrated(wrapped in paper) for home herbarium. Available for further study.

Added images of microscopy from my Celestron digital scope(poor photo quality w/only 40X as maximum zoom strength). Revealed that the spores are not distinctly round and are extremely large-some are nearly ellipsoid and somewhat smooth. Undeniably large compared to Amanita and other species spores I have analyzed over the years(lacking scope measurements with my equipment). All guidebooks and references I have checked show that H. microspermus has smaller, distinctly spiny spores and those in my added scoped images are nearly ellipsoid and irregular/hyaline. Possibly 2 asexual spore forms? The large size alone and shape irregularity would point to H. chrysospermus over H. microspermus even though they are indeed parasitizing a Xerocomellus. Sample available for future sequencing.

Species Lists

Images

IMG_8570.jpg
IMG_8571.jpg
IMG_8574.JPG
IMG_8575.JPG
Img00187.jpg
Note irregular, nearly ellipsoid shape and very large spore size.
Img00185.jpg
Note irregular, nearly ellipsoid shape and very large spore size.
Img00184.jpg
Note irregular, nearly ellipsoid shape and very large spore size.
Img00188.jpg
Note irregular, nearly ellipsoid shape and very large spore size.
IMG_8753.JPG
Microscopy from herbarium specimen(which I ironically labeled as H. microspermus after drying but fortunately posted as H.chrysospermus to force the investigation).
IMG_8752.JPG
Microscopy from herbarium specimen(which I ironically labeled as H. microspermus after drying but fortunately posted as H.chrysospermus to force the investigation).

Proposed Names

61% (2)
Recognized by sight: This species is much more common on Xerocomellus. Check the spore size to confirm.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

= Observer’s choice
= Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
No one has commented yet.

Created: 2018-11-05 07:08:20 CST (-0600)
Last modified: 2018-11-05 17:37:36 CST (-0600)
Viewed: 51 times, last viewed: 2019-07-11 08:23:57 CDT (-0500)
Show Log