Observation 45697: Pyrrhoglossum Singer

Notes:

Substrate: wood (unk. taxon)
Smell: nondescript
Spore Color: rusty brown

Collected for Milton Narváez and BioMindo in Bosque Experimental Nambillo.

Dried specimen obtainable with permission from la Universidad Central del Ecuador Fungorium.

Species Lists

Images

86450
86451

Proposed Names

29% (1)
Recognized by sight
58% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
Used references: Mushrooms of Hawaii (Desjardin, Hemmes)

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Be careful.
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-06-16 23:24:51 CDT (-0500)

Putting images like that in people’s heads may cause them to crack up. :)

it may grow on rotten logs…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2010-06-16 21:47:27 CDT (-0500)

but it is showy enuf to stick behind the ear of a tropical maiden.

Hawaii
By: Darvin DeShazer (darv)
2010-06-16 21:40:30 CDT (-0500)

KA = The island of Kauai. The book tells the reader where the species was collected.

“Is: KA”?
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2010-06-16 18:44:13 CDT (-0500)
.
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2010-06-15 11:48:33 CDT (-0500)

Mushrooms of Hawaii (Desjardin, Hemmes) describes Pyrrhoglossum pyrrhum as follows:

**

Pyrrhoglossum pyrrhum (Berk. & M. A. Curtis) Singer

Cap 5-15 mm broad, convex to fan shaped, margin wavy, nonstriate, surface suedelike to glabrous, pale brownish orange; odor strong and pleasant, taste very bitter. Gills adnexed, close to crowded, narrow, deep brownish orange. Stem rudimentary, lateral, 1-25 × 1 mm, minutely pubescent, brownish orange, arising from copious coarse white rhizomorphs. Spore deposit rusty brown. Edibility: unknown.

Pyrrhoglossum pyrrhum is a rare species in the Hawaiian Islands, known at present from a single population on the Kaluapuhi Trail at Koke’e State Park of Kaua’i. The fan-shaped caps with deep rusty brown gills and a rudimentary lateral stem, which arises from coarse white rhizomorphs, are diagnostic features. It grows on very rotten logs of native ohi’a trees. Is: KA.

**

Though not P. pyrrhum, this collection bears sufficient resemblance to its rare Hawaiian cousin to warrant the proposal that they may share the same genus.

Created: 2010-05-20 02:21:10 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2010-06-15 11:47:41 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 174 times, last viewed: 2018-07-16 02:52:37 CDT (-0500)
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