Observation 48706: Flavoparmelia Hale

When: 2010-07-17

Collection location: Parque de Monsanto, Lisboa, Portugal [Click for map]

Who: zaca

No specimen available

Notes:
Growing up on a rock in the woods.
According to the pictures I saw (in 1), can be one of the species Flavoparmelia caperata or F. baltimorensis.
Following 2 and 3 (which have not the 2nd species) the first grows both on trees and in rock.
According to 2 chemical reactions should be
Medulla and Soreda: K + / – dirty yellow, C-, KC + red, P + orange-red
which is not confirmed in my specimen that gave a strange reaction of medulla.
I have no data for the 2nd species.

Images

94109
94110
94111
The underside of the thallus
94112
Chemical reactions

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Comments

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chemistry is plausible
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2010-07-18 19:27:41 CDT (-0500)

The K +/- “dirty yellow” isn’t uncommon if you’re using a strong KOH solution, but not required, not sure why.

The KC+ red reaction should be very weak (I would call it pinkish) and fleeting. It is important that your C be fresh. And you must watch very closely because it only lasts a fraction of a second.

Chemical reactions on medulla don’t seem strange?
By: zaca
2010-07-18 18:04:34 CDT (-0500)

Thanks for the information, Jason.

By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2010-07-18 17:35:56 CDT (-0500)

F. caperata and F. baltimorensis are hard to distinguish. Note both can grow on rocks, but only F. caperata grows on bark. I have seen F. baltimorensis on weathered fence posts (wood), but never bark.

According to notes under F. baltimorensis in Lichens of North America, 2001: “F. caperata… has true granular soredia in irregular, laminal soralia that develop from flat pustules…” (F. baltimorensis has “globose, pustule-like outgrowths on the upper surface of the lobes, sometimes breaking down into granule-sized fragments”).

Yours doesn’t seem to have developed either soredia or pustules yet. The odds are that if it’s on rock, it’s F. baltimorensis.

Created: 2010-07-18 17:24:53 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2010-08-14 13:38:49 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 45 times, last viewed: 2017-06-07 20:52:20 CDT (-0500)
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