When: 2011-10-18

Collection location: Grassy Butte, North Dakota, USA [Click for map]

Who: Johannes Harnisch (Johann Harnisch)

No specimen available

Images

Copyright © 2011 Johannes Harnisch
Copyright © 2011 Johannes Harnisch
Copyright © 2011 Johannes Harnisch
Copyright © 2011 Johannes Harnisch
Copyright © 2011 Johannes Harnisch
Copyright © 2011 Johannes Harnisch
Copyright © 2011 Johannes Harnisch

Proposed Names

82% (3)
Recognized by sight: Found in grass,
Based on chemical features: flesh turning dark when cut.

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Comments

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By: Johannes Harnisch (Johann Harnisch)
2011-10-19 23:05:37 CST (+0800)

and as far as I could tell it did not have green colored spores or gills.

Looks correct to me.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2011-10-19 13:16:40 CST (+0800)

C. rachodes is a litter and straw decomposer, often found in grassy conditions. The stipe is chocolate-toned, as shown. Much darker than the more common (at least in my area) C. brunneum, which also stains reddish-brown to brown, especially near the base of the stipe, when scratched with a fingernail. C. rachodes will also turn rapidly chocolate-brown with handling, even when sporocarps are in a very young stage, as these are.